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Nairobi, Kenya, 2020: The Next Einstein Forum | Here’s a recap of the last edition in Kigali, Rwanda

The third edition of The Next Einstein Forum will be held in Nairobi, Kenya in 2020. Here’s a recap of the last edition held in the lovely, clean and green city of Kigali, in Rwanda. This blog post below, was culled from the Robert Bosch Stiftung Foundation website on January 15, 2019. It was written by Regina Mennig and originally published in April 2018.

The spirit of the Next Einstein Forum

In Kigali, the Next Einstein Forum initiative recently hosted the largest science conference in Africa to date. What does this conference mean to African scientists?

The Special Spirit of the Next Einstein Forum

In Kigali, the Next Einstein Forum initiative recently hosted the largest science conference in Africa to date. What does this conference mean to African scientists?

In Rwanda, in late March 2018, the air was shimmering with heat underneath the cupola of the Convention Centre. Here, Africa’s brightest minds came together to discuss the latest in research, share ideas, and exchange business cards.

About 1,500 people attended the global science conference of the Next Einstein Forum (NEF), including astrophysicists from Ethiopia, biologists from Zimbabwe, and nanotech researchers from Niger, while Nobel prize winners, publishers of leading scientific journals, and presidents of global research institutions mixed with the crowd. At the heart of the conference were the NEF Fellows, a group of outstanding young African scientists who received funding for their research projects…

 

What sets the largest pan-African science conference to date apart from other conferences around the globe? Maybe that a panel discussion about the gender gap in science and technology was opened with a poem? It was recited by Juliet Kego, an engineer, poet, and activist for the cause of encouraging women to enter STEM professions. “Today I will not bow,” the anaphora of her poem, resonated with the audience in the packed Gasabo plenary hall at the Convention Centre. And when she began to sing Amazing Grace, everyone stood up to join her in singing, and swaying along.

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Postcards From Africa | Fundamentals of Human Dignity by Pius Adesanmi

ANGEL MERKEL - QUOTES

An old post by Pius Adesanmi, I posted it a few years ago and based on recent events in Nigeria, I think it’s worth re-posting again. All the salient issues he raised then are still very relevant today. Enjoy!

[Culled from his Facebook Page on December 16, 2013, and re-posted here]

Fundamentals of Human Dignity. A multilevel compulsory subject to be taught from Primary One to Primary Six, from JSS One to SSS Three, from One Hundred Level to Four Hundred Level.

APC Ogas if you are interested in building this into your vision, call me. You have my number. I wanted folks to know that I suggested this to you so we don’t turn it into behind-the-scenes backpatting talks (brilliant idea, Prof, we shall do it and it is not done); so that you don’t say that nobody drew your attention to the matter.

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#PostcardsFromAfrica: “Progress Without Tears” By M.I. Okpara

In this edition of Postcards From Africa, we’ve decided to go back in time and revisit the wise words of some of our past national founders and builders. Sometimes, the answers for the present and future light we seek, may be buried in the shadows of our unexplored past.

I’d like to advocate that Michael Okpara’s philosophy and leadership principles be taught at schools in Nigeria and in fact made compulsory learning for all politicians, especially those of South Eastern origin. To think he was only 42 when he delivered this address! (Warning: It is a long read and yet so insightful, definitely worth every minute).

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#LeadershipMatters #PostcardsFromAfrica The Bridge Builder: Structuralist Vs Essentialist by Osita Chidoka

[This article below, written by Mr. Osita Chidoka, was initially published on “Scan News Nigeria” on February 23, 2016. It was accessed and reposted on WWN platform on May 24th, 2017, with permission from the author].

“The post-civil war generation should not inherit the prejudices of a failed past but build new coalitions that can re – negotiate the structure and, more importantly, the essence of the Nigerian state.” ~OSITA CHIDOKA

My debut column elicited a lot of comments on social media. I appreciate the comments, feedback and concerns. Going through the comments, I can discern two strong schools of thought. The first, for purposes of identification I refer to as the Structuralists and the second, the Essentialists. I got the terms from my interaction with Sam Amadi, one of my favourite intellectuals.

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#CelebratingWomenWhoDare -Dr Mina Ogbanga: Social Scientist & Trailblazer, Creating an Innovative Biofuel Gel for Domestic Cooking Initiative…

Dr. Mina Ogbanga

Ananke Platform shared a series of insightful dialogues on mainstreaming gender, sustainability and STEM. It was a 2-part series of titled –“STEM: PATHWAY TO SUSTAINABILITY” – featuring various dynamic women, who are trailblazers in STEM.
[To read the articles Click Here for Part ONE and Click Here for Part TWO].

#CelebratingWomenWhoDare One of those featured is our own Dr. Mina Ogbanga.
Dr Mina Ogbanga
Hailing
from Nigeria, Dr. Mina Ogbanga’s was enrolled in the College of Medical Sciences when she used to dream of transforming her home country for good. In addition to being a social scientist with a PhD degree in Sustainable Development Studies and another ongoing PhD in Public Policy; Dr. Mina has research and technical interest in Renewable Energy. She has an incredibly immense track record in STEM, with specialization in clean energy.

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#PostcardsFromAfrica – Enita Akpojevwe: Why I Am a Feminist in Nigeria.

The following post was culled from Bella Naija website [accessed on Tuesday, April 26, 2017; 8.45 pm EST], with the permission of the writer -Enita Akpojevwe

Recently, award-winning author and feminist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in an interview with the UK Guardian came out to say that she would be more successful in Nigeria if she is not a feminist.

“Feminism is not that hot. I can tell you I would sell more books in Nigeria if I stopped and said I’m no longer a feminist. I would have a stronger following, I would make more money” she said.

She is spot on in this case. Feminism in Nigeria is an endangered movement or belief; it is associated with so much bile, prejudice and stigmatization.

You are either ascribed to one or more of the following stereotypes; man-haters, angry nasty women, pro-abortionists, homosexual or pseudo homosexual, unmarried or a career woman, anti-motherhood, an atheist, unbeliever, a bad wife or an amoral woman. . .

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#Poetry4ChangeAfrica | Acclaimed Nigerian Poet Niyi Osundare’s Poem Shines a Spotlight on Corruption

“My Lord, Tell Me Where To Keep Your Bribe?” By Niyi Osundare

[Originally published on Sahara Reporters on Oct 26, 2016 and culled from saharareporters.com]

A poem by the renowned Nigerian poet Niyi Osundare.

niyi-osundare-poet

My Lord

   Please tell me where to keep your bribe?

Do I drop it in your venerable chambers

Or carry the heavy booty to your immaculate mansion

Shall I bury it in the capacious water tank

In your well laundered backyard

Or will it breathe better in the septic tank

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