#EducateAGirl: Investing in Girl-Child Education (STEM), in Nigeria.

Globally, new possibilities are being explored to expand the education ecosystem, especially in developing countries, through the use of Technology (Edu-Tech). The inter-connectivity of the Internet makes online learning and collaboration seamless, and this has ushered a new phase of innovations.

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#PostcardsFromALAIGBO: Congratulations to our contest winners!

As we wrap up the year, once again we wish to celebrate the inaugural winners of 

  • Iheanyi Igboko;  – His entry was about the Monthly Distinguished Speaker Series – Nkata Umu Ibe by Centre For Memories, Enugu, Nigeria
  • Nenye Nwobu;  – Her entry was about her experiences at the stage play “August Meeting”, produced by Raconteur Productions. The play chronicles the lives of the famous Oloko women, after they returned home, following the “Aba Women War.”

Both pieces will be featured on subsequent posts on our blog.

Some of our prizes include best-selling books, cash, and amazing event tickets etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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iSERVE2050: Are You Ready, Able and Willing to SERVE?

Leadership ◙ Advocacy ◙ Sustainable Communities ◙ Volunteerism

“Every generation must recognize and embrace the task it is peculiarly designed by history and by providence to perform.”

– Chinua Achebe

[There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra, 2012].

iSERVE2050 Golden Logo TwitterAre You Ready, Able and Willing to SERVE?

iSERVE2050  →  iGWEBUIKE! South East Renaissance Volunteer Experience

Re·​nais·​sance|\ˌre-nə-ˈsän(t)s; a movement or period of vigorous artistic and intellectual activity – [REBIRTHREVIVAL, AWAKENING, RENEWAL]

[VISION]

Building an African Success Story!

An integrated, borderless ALAIGBO that is advanced economically, technologically, educationally, and fair to all, irrespective of gender, disability, economic and social strata; retaining and attracting outstanding NDI-IGBO and citizens from Nigeria, Africa and the rest of the world.

[MISSION]

Empowering ONE Million Youth as SERVANT-LEADERS to TRANSFORM ALA-IGBO, one sustainable community at a time (A Nation of Leaders).

 

[PREMISE]:

“The trouble with Nigeria is simply a failure of leadership…The Nigerian problem is the unwillingness or inability of its leaders to rise to the responsibility, to the challenge of personal example which are the hallmarks of true leadership.” – Chinua Achebe

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#PostcardsFromAlaigbo | #NkataUmuIbe: Jide Ofo -Politics of Conscience & Ideology by Dike Chukwumerije

“No culture is older than being human; this is the truth, and until we accept it, our nation will struggle on its broken feet. For the same things can bind us that drive us apart. For the wall and the bridge are both in the heart.”
– Dike Chukwumerije

 

The following piece, “The Days of Small Beginnings”, written by Dike Chukwumerije, was culled from Africa Travel News -ATQ

 

In January 2016, on my way to Nnewi, I stopped to see the Radio Nigeria South East Zonal Director in Enugu. Ken Ike Okere had an idea, to replicate the sort of literary society he had helped nurture in Abuja, and wanted to know if I was game.

And so began a love affair with the Coal City, flying in to attend the monthly Enugu Literary Society meetings, till the whirlwind of MADE IN NIGERIA struck. And, still, Enugu was my 2nd stop. I tell you. Not till Maiduguri, a year later, did I find an audience as embracing as the one I found in 042.

So, in 2017, when I bumped into Patrick Okigbo III in Abuja, and he told me about this thing he was doing in Enugu – this Centre for Memories, conjuring images of ghostly figures striding out of the harmattan mist on a cold December morning – I told him, if there’s anything I can do to help, let me know.

And he did – after he’d run a rousing campaign for Osita Chidoka in Anambra, and Nnanna Ude had called to ask me to speak for 10 minutes at the 23rd Nigerian Economic Summit in Abuja, and he and Nnanna Ude had started a Guest Speaker Series, ‘Nkata Umu Ibe’, in Enugu – after all this, Patrick Okigbo III called to know if I would be their 4th ‘distinguished speaker’.

Me? True. This is not an easy path to follow, you know? After Professor Okey Ndibe, and Professor Chidi Odinkalu, and Dr. Okey Ikechukwu, and knowing Chief John Nnia Nwodo would be 5th, me?? So, I went first – as every child in troubled times is guided by our culture – to my mother’s hut. And she put a few words in my mouth and said, Speak from the heart.

And then I went to Enugu. To Enugu Sports Club, to be exact, where the history etched into the timber columns and the high ceilings had me staring. You see? Ben Etiaba, Chairman of the Club, gave me the tour himself. Stopping on the way to introduce Stan Okoronkwo, ex-Enugu Rangers from the legendary ‘70s squad, and Professor and Professor Okoronkwo, the pleasant parents of Ndidi Nwuneli. And I thought again – me??

Because there to listen, in a hall quickly filling up, was Dr Joe Nworgu, former Secretary General of Ohanaeze Ndigbo. To his far right was an old friend of my mother’s, and former FRCN boss, Chief Kelvin Ejiofor. And to his immediate left was an old friend of my father’s, and former DG of the National Orientation Agency, Professor Elo Amucheazi.

You see? I am as I am. The jeans I feel most comfortable in, and the shirt with sleeves rolled up to the elbows. I am often awkward in Nigerian social circles because I am not great at protocol and so can offend without meaning to. You understand? But Professor Amucheazi sat me close, even before the lecture, and said, ‘I am very proud of you’. And this is the confidence Love gives – to validate first.

So, I went to the lectern, where the speaker stands alone. From there I saw the amazing Igbo poet, Amarachi Atama, who had come from the screening of her latest documentary, ‘Biafuru’ to be present. Further back, Osinayah Prince Agu, who I knew had come all the way from Aba.

From there, I remembered the warnings of Nnanna Udeh and Patrick Okigbo III, to expect an expectant crowd, for the hall had erupted in spontaneous applause when they were told I was coming, how Nnanna then laughed at the look on my face and added, ‘No pressure!’ And so, I gripped the lectern with two hands, took a deep breath – thought of my mother and the grey that charges like smouldering fire through her hair – and began to speak.

“We must, even in the face of excessive provocation, maintain our demand for a more meritocratic society where people are judged not by their tribe or religion but by their competence and ability. Because it is only this that can release the potential of this nation and all of its constituent parts.

That is why Meritocracy is an Ideal worth fighting for. That is why it is an Ideal worth dying for. That is why we cannot give up on it simply because of the odds stacked against it, or because other people are acting differently and succeeding thereby. No. It is in times like these, in the face of frustration and overwhelming resistance, that we must remember proverbs like ‘mberede ka e ji a ma dike’.

Because if apartheid could end in South Africa, if segregation could end in America, then meritocracy is possible in Nigeria. But in the pursuit of that Ideal there will be many days when we will be tempted to give up on our innermost convictions and give in to what is most convenient.

It is on those days that we must remember the weight and import of that hallowed command, ‘Jide Ofo!’ For if we do, if we hold on to our Ideals and refuse to let go no matter what this world does to us, then there is, and will always be, hope for the better parts of our collective humanity.”

This is what I said. And Professor Elo Amucheazi rose to his feet. And Ben Etiaba brought out a fresh bottle of Hennessy, tipped a little to the concrete floor, and said, ‘You have done me great honour’. It is true, I tell you, that there is never a time the truth should not be spoken. But, know this too, every truth has its time to be heard.

So, if your heart stirs consistently in a certain direction, rugged and rough, persevere in what it asks you to say. For, my brother, you can never tell by looking at the turbulence around you in which Times you live. True. This is what we mean when we say, ‘Jide Ofo’. It is how to walk through the darkness…

042. I thank you for the love.

Nkata Umu Ibe – the Monthly distinguished Guest Speaker Series of the Centre for Memories – holds on the First Fridays of every month at Enugu Sports Club, Enugu.

Enugu Literary Society holds its meeting on the 2nd Saturday of every month at Radio House, Enugu.

For did you not know? There is no tsunami that does not begin with a wave.

By Dike Chukwumerije

 

______________________

About the Centre for Memories, Enugu | @cfmemories

The Center for Memories is a repository of the history & culture of Ndigbo, informing and empowering leaders to serve with excellence and integrity, with a vision to be the leading hub for Igbo history, culture, and excellence.

#WWNetworkAfrica #FLOW -“Why is Financial Literacy Important for Women?”

“Money has some rules attached to it.

And if you follow the rules, you’re going to have more stability in your life than if you don’t follow the rules.

Doesn’t matter if you’re a man or a woman.

The rules are the same: You need to have a plan for how you use your money, you need to have a healthy credit identity, you need to have emergency money and some insurance.

I think it’s really important that we come to realize that life is about balance, that it’s not all or nothing. It’s not spending every waking moment thinking about money or spending no time thinking about money.

Managing money isn’t really that hard. It requires some discipline and there is some detail involved, but in reality it doesn’t take that much time and the payback is huge.” –Gail Vaz-Oxlade 

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#Poetry4ChangeAfrica: Once Upon A Time (A Poem) by Gabriel Okara

 

Once upon a time, son,
they used to laugh with their hearts
and laugh with their eyes:
but now they only laugh with their teeth,
while their ice-block-cold eyes
search behind my shadow.

There was a time indeed
they used to shake hands with their hearts:
but that’s gone, son.
Now they shake hands without hearts
while their left hands search
my empty pockets.

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“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” – Helen Keller

PARTNERS/COLLABORATORS

  • EKCEP (EnvironFocus Knowledge and Culture Exchange Program) –is an avenue for teachers in developed countries (Canada) and in developing countries in Africa, to work together in solving sustainability issues, thereby fostering innovation among children.

  • EKCEP aims to solve the following questions:

    I. How do we raise children that will solve the sustainability problems of the present and the future?

    II. How do we transfer knowledge that is unbiased?

    III. How do we create solutions that are trans-boundary and take cultures into consideration?

    IV. How do we ensure that single stories are not told?

  • WAAW FOUNDATIONWorking to Advance African Women and Girls in STEM Education

  • PAS PRIZE, Nigeria – an Educational Reward Program produced by “Developing Talents in Our Society Initiative” for recognizing and rewarding Educational achievements of outstanding secondary school students in Nigeria.

  • PRAXIS HANGOUT –is a quarterly gathering of creative people in Nigeria, where they interact with their fans and fellow lovers of the arts. We bring artists from across board: painters, writers, performance poets, actors, musicians, film-makers etc.

  • HAGI – Hope for African Girls Initiative; through community service projects, HAGI empowers African girls on leadership and personal independence, by enlightening them on their possibilities as stakeholders in a democratic environment, rather than its victims.