#WWNetworkAfrica #FLOW -“Why is Financial Literacy Important for Women?”

“Money has some rules attached to it.

And if you follow the rules, you’re going to have more stability in your life than if you don’t follow the rules.

Doesn’t matter if you’re a man or a woman.

The rules are the same: You need to have a plan for how you use your money, you need to have a healthy credit identity, you need to have emergency money and some insurance.

I think it’s really important that we come to realize that life is about balance, that it’s not all or nothing. It’s not spending every waking moment thinking about money or spending no time thinking about money.

Managing money isn’t really that hard. It requires some discipline and there is some detail involved, but in reality it doesn’t take that much time and the payback is huge.” –Gail Vaz-Oxlade 

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#Poetry4ChangeAfrica: Once Upon A Time (A Poem) by Gabriel Okara

 

Once upon a time, son,
they used to laugh with their hearts
and laugh with their eyes:
but now they only laugh with their teeth,
while their ice-block-cold eyes
search behind my shadow.

There was a time indeed
they used to shake hands with their hearts:
but that’s gone, son.
Now they shake hands without hearts
while their left hands search
my empty pockets.

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“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” – Helen Keller

PARTNERS/COLLABORATORS

  • EKCEP (EnvironFocus Knowledge and Culture Exchange Program) –is an avenue for teachers in developed countries (Canada) and in developing countries in Africa, to work together in solving sustainability issues, thereby fostering innovation among children.

  • EKCEP aims to solve the following questions:

    I. How do we raise children that will solve the sustainability problems of the present and the future?

    II. How do we transfer knowledge that is unbiased?

    III. How do we create solutions that are trans-boundary and take cultures into consideration?

    IV. How do we ensure that single stories are not told?

  • WAAW FOUNDATIONWorking to Advance African Women and Girls in STEM Education

  • PAS PRIZE, Nigeria – an Educational Reward Program produced by “Developing Talents in Our Society Initiative” for recognizing and rewarding Educational achievements of outstanding secondary school students in Nigeria.

  • PRAXIS HANGOUT –is a quarterly gathering of creative people in Nigeria, where they interact with their fans and fellow lovers of the arts. We bring artists from across board: painters, writers, performance poets, actors, musicians, film-makers etc.

  • HAGI – Hope for African Girls Initiative; through community service projects, HAGI empowers African girls on leadership and personal independence, by enlightening them on their possibilities as stakeholders in a democratic environment, rather than its victims.

Postcards From Africa | Fundamentals of Human Dignity by Pius Adesanmi

ANGEL MERKEL - QUOTES

An old post by Pius Adesanmi, I posted it a few years ago and based on recent events in Nigeria, I think it’s worth re-posting again. All the salient issues he raised then are still very relevant today. Enjoy!

[Culled from his Facebook Page on December 16, 2013, and re-posted here]

Fundamentals of Human Dignity. A multilevel compulsory subject to be taught from Primary One to Primary Six, from JSS One to SSS Three, from One Hundred Level to Four Hundred Level.

APC Ogas if you are interested in building this into your vision, call me. You have my number. I wanted folks to know that I suggested this to you so we don’t turn it into behind-the-scenes backpatting talks (brilliant idea, Prof, we shall do it and it is not done); so that you don’t say that nobody drew your attention to the matter.

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#POETRY4Change – Hadraawi: Celebrating the great Somali Poet by KHAINGA O’OKWEMBA

Maya Angelou Poetry for Change

[This article was written by KHAINGA O’OKWEMBA and is culled from http://www.the-star.co.ke]

Legend has it that in early 1970s, renowned Somali female singer Magool gave a concert in Khartoum, Sudan. Magool returned home leaving behind an enchanted man: a Sudanese man had fallen in love with the Somali nightingale! But she was gone.

The man decided to write her a love letter which he then posted. Unable to read this letter because it was written in Arabic, Magool sought the help of Hadraawi, the celebrated Somali poet, who spoke the language.

The letter was presumably written in red ink, but as Hadraawi read it he discovered that the love-stricken man had used blood drawn from his veins which he had put into a fountain pen and poured his heart out! Hadraawi, the great poet that he is, had his imagination soaring. To come to terms with what he’d just encountered, Hadraawi wrote the famous poem, Has Love Ever Been Written in Blood.

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#WWNAdvocacy #NwanyiBuIfe #ShatteringTheSilence |#MeToo by Eketi Edima Ette


I’m angry.

I heard the story of a certain school in Lagos taking the side of a teacher against a three-year old girl’s accusation of sexual impropriety. When I read that headline, I felt a heavy ball drop in my stomach; a potpourri of pain, incandescent rage, and horror. I have been there. I was three too.

At first, I didn’t want to write this but I’ll do it for her. I’ll do it because when it comes to toddlers and older children, in the face of evidence properly collected, many people still believe they have no memories of traumatic experiences, and are prone to telling tales.

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#Poetry4ChangeAfrica: Poem -“Elegy for a Nation” by Wole Soyinka (for the late Chinua Achebe at 70)

Elegy for a Nation

Ah, Chinua, are you grapevine wired?
It sings: our nation is not dead, not clinically
Yet. Now this may come as a surprise to you,
It was to me. I thought the form I spied
Beneath the frosted glass of a fifty-carat catafalque
Was the face of our own dear land — ‘own,’ ‘dear,’
Voluntary patriotese, you’ll note — we try to please.
An anthem’s sentiment upholds the myth.

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